Category Archive: Reconciliation

Prayer for our Nation

“The Return,” led by Jonathan Cahn, occurred Friday evening and all day Saturday in Washington D.C., while evangelist Franklin Graham led tens of thousands on a prayer march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument.

Don and I watched this significant event most of the day Saturday. I was often in tears of praise and petition to our God!

Its purpose was to bring people together from across the country to pray for repentance and renewal in these United States.

I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness.

I Timothy 2:1-2 NIV

And how our nation needs healing in the midst of our pandemic, riots, murders, and fires.

It thrilled my heart to see the estimated 50,000 people walk peacefully – I didn’t even see a police presence! – from the National Mall from the Lincoln Memorial to the U.S. Capitol, stopping to pray at seven memorials along the way. No riots, no fights, no broken windows or graffiti, just a peaceful march interspersed with small groups praying together along the way.

“People prayed at the World War II Memorial for the military and police, at the Washington Monument for solutions to the pandemic and the end of abortion, and at the National Museum of African American History and Culture for respect and reconciliation between the races — among other stops.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/prayer-march-national-mall/2020/09/26/e401f184-002f-11eb-b555-4d71a9254f4b_story.html

I was pleased to hear Myron Lizer, Vice President of the Navajo Nation, pray for healing of the nations, affirming the key role of the Navajo code talkers in WWII.

Also from The Washington Post article:

“’The country isn’t as divided as they say,’ (attendee Laura Guilfo, attending with a friend) said, gesturing to the thousands milling peacefully near the Washington Monument, where flags were at half-staff for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and near the White House, where Trump was about to announce her replacement at a news conference. ‘The evidence is all around you.’

The women, both Black, said, ”’We look at it from a Christian worldview, not a secular worldview. Evil is now good, and good has become evil. There is no ‘social justice.’ There’s just justice.’”

I know we have a long way to go to achieve racial reconciliation and true justice in our country. But I’m thankful for these men of vision who led us in worshipping our God in the nation’s capitol, who understand our hope lies not in politics, not in trying to “be better,” but in repentance and humility asking God to change our hearts from the inside out. May God have mercy on us!

FINDING HOPE

In Finding Hope: Steps toward Racial Reconciliation, Pastor Hurmon Hamilton taught from the story of Lazarus in John chapter 11.

Three keys he mentioned from this story were:

  1. Listen graciously. So often we listen while we’re preparing our response, whether it’s defending our own actions, justifying certain behaviors, or even agreeing with what we’re hearing. Jesus listened to Lazarus’ sisters who both bared their hearts, saying “If you’d only been here, our brother would not have died.” Jesus didn’t rebuke them; rather, He wept with them.
  2. Reflect prayerfully. What is our God-led response to what we hear (rather than our knee-jerk reaction)? Jesus saw the sisters’ pain, and that of the mourners, and was “greatly troubled.” He asked “Where have you laid Him?” The mourners didn’t just point the way – they said “Come and see.” And He went with them.
  3. Act thoughtfully. John 11:38-39 says “Then Jesus, deeply moved again, came to the tomb … Jesus said, ‘Take away the stone.'” Martha, never one to hold her tongue, said but Lord, he’s been dead four days. Surely he stinks by now!

Jesus spoke to His Father, then cried out loudly, “Lazarus, come forth.” And Lazarus, wrapped in graveclothes, bound and stiff, walked out of the tomb. Jesus told the watchers to take the graveclothes off the man, because he was no longer dead, but alive!

I hate what’s happening in our country now. The riots, looting, violence, burning Bibles and flags. I’ve never experienced such a divisive time in my lifetime.

And no, we’re not each responsible for the racial injustices we see in our world. But as Christ-followers it is our moment to stand up and show the world who we are in Jesus.

And there are many reasons to listen, to reflect prayerfully, and to act thoughtfully. I have not experienced the systemic racism that instituted Jim Crow laws, that led to the formation of the Ku Klux Klan, that gave higher-interest mortgages–or none–to persons of color, because I am Caucasian. But my heart goes out to those who have been unfairly treated and given less opportunity simply because of the color of their melanin.

I want to follow Jesus’ example. Pastor Hamilton suggested asking our brothers and sisters to tell us their story of being African American in America–and listening!

If you’d like to hear the entire sermon, follow this link. I think you’ll be challenged and encouraged as Don and I were.

Resentment: Reverse Poison

Lying in bed a few years ago, I thought of the people who would travel with us on a much-anticipated trip the following day. One woman had offended me on a prior trip. I thought I’d forgiven her. However, as I prayed I realized I still felt a tinge of antagonism toward her.

“I don’t want that Lord,” I confessed. “Will you please remove the bitterness from my heart.”

When I saw this woman the next morning, I flinched. I had a choice to make, since she hadn’t yet seen us. By God’s grace I chose to greet her with a smile. And she, against whom I had carried a kernel of dislike, responded with warm words of affirmation. We enjoyed talking and kidding around during the remainder of the trip. It felt good to have the resentment gone, that poison flushed out of my system.

When I ask the Father for help He is so very willing to respond, to make me more like Himself.

“For it is God who is at work within you, giving you the will and the power to achieve his purpose.”

Philippians 2:12-b13

Someone once said holding onto resentment is like drinking poison and expecting the other guy to die. Wise words, especially with all the divisiveness in our nation today. And holding onto resentment makes us bitter, dissatisfied, unhappy. Not the way I want to live.

“Let all bitterness and indignation and wrath (passion, rage, bad temper) and resentment (anger, animosity) and quarreling (brawling, clamor, contention) and slander (evil-speaking, abusive or blasphemous language) be banished from you, with all malice (spite, ill will, or baseness of any kind).”

Ephesians 4:31

Are you holding onto resentment or bitterness? Can you hand those to the God who wants us to be whole, righteous, just, at peace? Why not allow God to do His refining work in you, realizing His purposes are above yours and mine?

Blessings, dear readers.

How Do We Start the Conversation?

Happy Father’s Day to all the Dads out there – and especially to mine in heaven, John Froese. I love you Dad!

So in this video Dad’s grandson, Drew Froese, starts a conversation with his friend Chris. Both are pastors. I love that during this time when we are very focused on racial reconciliation, the Church is starting these dialogues which I hope will continue long past the current protests.

https://youtu.be/o3yWfn4TAkc

It’s a conversation worth listening to. (And there are others found at tlc.org/reconcile, then click on “Conversations”.) When Jesus taught us to pray, He started with “Our Father …” and He’s a good good Father! But the “our” suggests that, while we pray individually, we also pray corporately – with all our brothers and sisters of every race and nationality and tribe.

He adopted you as his own children … now if we are children, then we are heirs–heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ …

Romans 8:15, 17a

Let’s continue the conversation. I’d love to hear your response.

Blessings!