Prayer for our Nation

“The Return,” led by Jonathan Cahn, occurred Friday evening and all day Saturday in Washington D.C., while evangelist Franklin Graham led tens of thousands on a prayer march from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument.

Don and I watched this significant event most of the day Saturday. I was often in tears of praise and petition to our God!

Its purpose was to bring people together from across the country to pray for repentance and renewal in these United States.

I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness.

I Timothy 2:1-2 NIV

And how our nation needs healing in the midst of our pandemic, riots, murders, and fires.

It thrilled my heart to see the estimated 50,000 people walk peacefully – I didn’t even see a police presence! – from the National Mall from the Lincoln Memorial to the U.S. Capitol, stopping to pray at seven memorials along the way. No riots, no fights, no broken windows or graffiti, just a peaceful march interspersed with small groups praying together along the way.

“People prayed at the World War II Memorial for the military and police, at the Washington Monument for solutions to the pandemic and the end of abortion, and at the National Museum of African American History and Culture for respect and reconciliation between the races — among other stops.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/prayer-march-national-mall/2020/09/26/e401f184-002f-11eb-b555-4d71a9254f4b_story.html

I was pleased to hear Myron Lizer, Vice President of the Navajo Nation, pray for healing of the nations, affirming the key role of the Navajo code talkers in WWII.

Also from The Washington Post article:

“’The country isn’t as divided as they say,’ (attendee Laura Guilfo, attending with a friend) said, gesturing to the thousands milling peacefully near the Washington Monument, where flags were at half-staff for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and near the White House, where Trump was about to announce her replacement at a news conference. ‘The evidence is all around you.’

The women, both Black, said, ”’We look at it from a Christian worldview, not a secular worldview. Evil is now good, and good has become evil. There is no ‘social justice.’ There’s just justice.’”

I know we have a long way to go to achieve racial reconciliation and true justice in our country. But I’m thankful for these men of vision who led us in worshipping our God in the nation’s capitol, who understand our hope lies not in politics, not in trying to “be better,” but in repentance and humility asking God to change our hearts from the inside out. May God have mercy on us!

6 Responses

  1. Kate Henry Miller says:

    Hi, Carol– This is not for posting, but I noted that the pronoun used for Ruth Bader Ginsberg above is “his replacement.” Thought you might want to fix that.(You were instrumental in helping me notice such things.)

  2. Shirley Buxton says:

    This is such an important post. I fully agree. Thank you for articulating what many of us are feeling.

  3. Karen O'Connor says:

    Thank you, Carol. I really appreciate your summary of this peaceful event since I did not see it

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

HTML tags are not allowed.

21,099 Spambots Blocked by Simple Comments